Isaac Newton Letters


Collection Summary

Title: Isaac Newton Letters
Call Number: MS 2002-05
Size: 0.25 linear feet
Acquisition: Purchased from C. Wesley Cowan, 2000
Processed by: KKJ, 12-18-2001; MN, 2-18-2004; MN, 9-29-2011



Literary Rights

Literary rights were not granted to Wichita State University. When permission is granted to examine manuscripts, it is not an authorization to publish them. Manuscripts cannot be used for publication without regard for common law literary rights, copyright laws and the laws of libel. It is the responsibility of the researcher and his/her publisher to obtain permission to publish. Scholars and students who eventually plan to have their work published are urged to make inquiry regarding overall restrictions on publication before initial research.


Content Note

This collection of letters primarily contains correspondence from Isaac Newton to his father Asa Newton during the American Civil War. Private Isaac Newton, Company G, 93rd Ohio Infantry, relates the daily concerns of a Union soldier in his letters. Many of his letters originate from Hospital No. 18 in Louisville, Kentucky, where he was both a patient and a nurse. Although his unit served in General Lew Wallace's division and in General Ulysses S. Grant's Army of the Cumberland in the western theatre of the war, Newton's letters reveal very little about strategy or military decisions; however, he frequently mentions the benevolent activities of the women in Louisville concerning the hospital. In addition, several letters from other Newton family members are included. The bulk of the letters date from 1861-1863.


Series Listing 

Series 1

Box1 FF 1-4

Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1862-1863. This series contains some correspondence of Isaac Newton to his family during the American Civil War. Isaac Newton writes to his father Asa, his mother Lydia, his sisters Sarah and Sallie (who may be the same person) and brother Samuel. He mainly writes of conditions in a Union hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, where he was both a patient and a nurse.

Series 2

Box 1 FF 5

Correspondence of Asa Newton, 1862-1863. This series contains some correspondence of Asa Newton, father of Isaac, who resided in Camden, Ohio, a western Ohio city.

Series 3

Box 1 FF 6-8

Correspondence of James and Lucy Newton Craig, 1861-1863. This series contains some correspondence of a married couple settled in central Indiana. Lucy Newton Craig is the sister of Isaac Newton and the daughter of Asa and Lydia Newton.

Series 4

Box 1 FF 9-10

Related correspondence. This series contains some miscellaneous correspondence, some of which relates to the Newton family, and empty used envelopes.

 


Box and Folder Listing

Series 1 – Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1862-1863

     

Box 1

FF 1

Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1862. Isaac Newton writes about being mustered into the service today (August 20, 1862, Camp Dayton, Ohio). Isaac writes to his father Asa about moving with his regiments across Ohio and into Kentucky under the direction of General Lew Wallace (August 26, 1862, Lexington, Kentucky). Isaac describes camp conditions to his father Isaac and requests some boots (September 14, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac sends his dress coat home (September 20, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes about the mail running slow and also describes digging rifle pits (September 22, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes to his father Asa about marching across the Chapel Hill Battlefield and describes the remains of rebels he observed there (October 15, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes to his father Asa about being on the march for 16 days (October 16, 1862, Crab Orchard, Kentucky). Isaac writes to discourage his father Asa from coming to see him and tells his mother to keep in good spirits (October 26, 1862, Lebanon, Kentucky).

Box 1

FF 2

Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1862 (continued). Isaac writes to his father saying he has been ill and that he received boots, socks, gloves, handkerchief and letter containing stamps (November 2, 1862, Lebanon, Kentucky). Isaac writes to his mother Lydia Newton and reports that he hid behind baggage on a wagon in order to be transported to hospital number 2 in Lebanon and then moved on to a hospital ward in Louisville. He says he had camp fever and diarrhea (November 14, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes to his sister Sallie about his hospital ward and also says he will earn $20.50 a month working in a Union Army medical ward. He sends brotherly advice concerning men (November 20, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac describes his work as a nurse to his father Asa (November 25, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes to his father Asa and says he is "recovered almost fully" and is now head nurse in ward of 35 patients. The ladies of Louisville served Thanksgiving dinner which included pig with flag in its mouth. (December 3, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac describes to his sister Sarah new patients from Bowling Green as the "hardest, dirtiest looking set of men" that he had ever seen. He sends her more brotherly advice about men (December 10, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac describes barrel that friend Smith received: it contained butter, apples, sorghum, molasses, cakes and beef. "We live rich now," he writes to his father Asa (December 15, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac describes to sister the Christmas dinner a Louisville woman is solely furnishing for 75 to 100 men including him. He says there are many benevolent women in Louisville (December 22, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac gives advice to brother Samuel about continuing his education and how it will serve in the future. He describes a man in his ward who has contracted typhoid fever (December 22, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes his father Asa of all the wonderful things he ate at Christmas dinner prepared by Mrs. Ewing, "even to egg nog in abundance" (December 26, 1862, Louisville, Kentucky).

Box 1

FF 3

Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1863. All letters originate from Hospital No. 18, Louisville, Kentucky. Isaac writes his father Asa and says it snowed so heavily that roofs were caving in. He helped remove snow from the hospital. He reports that the hospital received many wounded from Murfreesboro and describes their wounds (January 21, 1863). Isaac writes to his father that there are 100 patients in the hospital and 26 in his care (March 5, 1863). Isaac reports to his father Asa about Easter and Election Day. A Union Democrat defeated a Secessionist for Mayor. General Burnsides presently is in Louisville (April 5, 1863). Isaac writes his father Asa and speaks of not being paid. The full hospital has change in administration from Dr. Reynolds to Dr. Gardner (April 18, 1863). Isaac reports to his sister Sallie that "Pic Nic" parties are common in Louisville. He observes that the locals are flying the stars and stripes. Young ladies come to the hospital to play the piano (May 4, 1863). Isaac writes his father Asa and mentions not being paid and is expecting $130.00 from "Uncle Sam" (May 18, 1863). Isaac writes his sister Sallie and discusses victory at Vicksburg for Union side. He is hoping to come home on a "leaf" of absence (May 27, 1863).

Box 1

FF 4

Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1863 (continued). Isaac writes to his sister Sallie and tells her he is not afraid of smallpox and scarlet fever. Louisville's ladies are going to make a flag presentation at the hospital, and he received bouquet from a lady in Middleton. He comments about men at home wanting to marry before the soldiers return (June 2, 1863, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes to his father Asa about a Louisville grain warehouse accident and subsequent fire in which two men died. He says he has "got about well" and is still hoping for a leave of absence (June 8, 1863, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac reports to his father Asa about the ladies fo Ward No. 2 presenting a beautiful flag to the hospital in ceremony with speeches, band music, patriotic songs and refreshments. He enclosed a flag decoration from the table for Sarah (June 16, 1863, Louisville, Kentucky). Isaac writes his father Asa about martial law being declared in Louisville and that rebels were thought to have crossed over to Kentucky that morning (July 11, 1863, Louisville, Kentucky). In this letter to his father Asa, Isaac describes the week long march to Alabama during which he observed mountainous terrain, rattlesnakes, peach orchards, chestnuts, bee hives, chicken and potatoes. He states that he thinks "the war will be over before a great while" (August 23, 1863, Camp near Bellefont, Alabama).

 

Series 2 – Correspondence of Asa Newton, 1862-1863

     

Box 1

FF 5

Correspondence of Asa Newton, 1862-1863. Asa Newton writes to inform that son Isaac is better and that he will try to get him to Louisville (October (?) 1862, Lebanon, Kentucky). Asa writes to his son Isaac about an order for the draft in Ohio for 12,000. He tells him that they have heard the news about the fall of Kingston, Knoxville and Chattanooga (September 11, 1863, Camden, Ohio). Albert Ritz writes to Asa Newton explaining that he had borrowed money from Isaac and is submitting repayment to Asa (Hospital No. 18, Louisville, Kentucky, September 25, 1863).

 

Series 3 – Correspondence of James and Lucy Newton Craig, 1861-1863

     

Box 1

FF 6

Correspondence of James and Lucy Newton Craig, 1861. James and Lucy Newton Craig write to her father and mother Asa and Lydia Newton regarding a pen to keep their hogs in containment (October 17, 1861, Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana). James and Lucy write to her parents concerning the name of their baby (November 23, 1861, Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana). James writes to his father-in-law Asa and includes a request from Lucy for sage seeds (December 1, 1861, Columbus, Indiana).

Box 1

FF 7

Correspondence of James and Lucy Newton Craig, 1862. James Craig writes to his father-in-law Asa Newton about the harvest in Columbus, Indiana. The letter includes short notes from Lucy Craig to her mother and James Craig to his sister-in-law Sarah D. Newton (January 26, 1862, Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana). The Craigs write to her parents that they received the sage seed and that William and Felix, friends of theirs, wore out their welcome at their home (March 2, 1862, Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana). James N. Craig informs Asa Newton that those who have been sick are improved. He reports about a debt of $119.62 (April 16, 1862, Elizabethtown, Indiana). James N. Craig writes to Mary Jane Craig about money (August 6, 1862, no location indicated). James Craig writes to the Newton family that it snowed nearly all day. He states that they had not heard from Isaac recently. He also writes of wheat prices at 90 cents (a bushel?) (November 2, 1862, Elizabethtown, Bartholomew County, Indiana). Lucy writes to her family and asks about Isaac. The letter includes some lines from Jim (James) concerning farm and market prices (November 23, 1862, Elizabethtown, Indiana).

Box 1

FF 8

Correspondence of James and Lucy Newton Craig, 1863. James and Lucy Craig write her parents Asa and Lydia Newton with news of soldiers Robert and Enoch, but say they "long to hear from Isaac" (October 30, 1863, Elizabethtown, Indiana).

 

Series 4 – Related Correspondence

     

Box 1

FF 9

Related correspondence, 1862-1866. J. F. C. writes to Asa Newton and family about illnesses, A name of Lydia has been chosen for the baby's name, and "Jane sends Mother some of the babes hair in this letter" (March 18, 1862, Elizabethtown, Bartholomew County, Indiana). Unknown soldier writes to his mother, handwriting nearly illegible, on stationery with printed drawing depicting Battle of Winchester (September 1862, location illegible). David Ramsey writes a very brief note to "Emmy" Newton saying she must be home when he comes over (February 1, 1866). Willard N. Van Hoosen writes Sarah Newton about the letter she received from David Ramsey. Van Hoosen confesses that he not Ramsey wrote it and would like to exchange photographs with her (Mobile, Alabama, December 17, 1866).

Box 1

FF 10

Empty envelopes